Today, as anticipated, the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) published its final rule raising the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) salary threshold for the executive, administrative, and professional (EAP) exemptions to $35,568 per year, or $684 per week, effective January 1, 2020. It is considered an Employee Protection Act whereby employees are generally presumed non-exempt and entitled to overtime pay. Starting January 1, 2020 the salary threshold for an "exempt" employee under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will increase to $648 per week, or $35,568 annually. Fair Labor Standards Act: Observations on the Effects of the Home Care Rule GAO-21-72: Published: Oct 19, 2020. This type of benefit is generally a matter of agreement between an employer and an employee (or the employee's representative). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), commonly referred to as the Wage and Hour Act, was passed in 1938 and since then has been amended many times. The major change is that the “standard salary level” is $684 per week, or $35,568 per year which is nearly 50% increase from the current threshold. On December 22, 2020, the Department of Labor announced a final rule revising its tipped employee regulations to address amendments made to section 3(m) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 (CAA). On December 22, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule revising its tipped employee regulations to address amendments made to section 3(m) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 (CAA). Publicly Released: Oct 19, 2020. The FLSA places limitations and requirements on the rate and method of pay for public and private employees who are covered by the law. On-call conditions. It applies in every state, but the states are free to pass laws that are more generous to employees and to regulate the rare cases in which federal law does not apply. What is the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act?. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a federal law governing overtime, minimum wage, and child labor. The Federal Fair Labor Standard Act is a law that was enacted to set minimum wage, minimum age, and overtime requirements for both employees and employers.The FLSA also determines the 40-hour workweek and the types of behaviors that are considered to be "working." On September 24, 2019, the US Department of Labor announced the final version of its rule. To answer this question we will review on-call conditions and the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) that governs the rules of on-call time. The DOL published its “Independent Contractor Status Under the Fair Labor Standards Act” proposed rule on September 25, 2020, and it contains the following five-factor test: New overtime rules under Fair Labor Standards Act take affect 2020 and will impact churches, nonprofit and business. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a law administered by the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor. By H. Robert Showers, Esq. On December 22, 2020, the Department of Labor announced a final rule revising its tipped employee regulations to address amendments made to section 3(m) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 (CAA). The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not require payment for time not worked, including attending a funeral. When an employee is on-call they are waiting to be called upon by their employer or supervisor to perform a …